Fall 2014 First-Year Seminars

FYE 2014 Brochure

 

1 For Fun

We believe every new MSU student should take one course just for the fun of it: a small class with an excellent teacher to teach you something really interesting in his or her field - from practical gardening to neurological bases of morality, real world CSI to MSU traditions, human and veterinary medicine to nanotechnology, NASCAR racing and hunting dogs to SEC football - plus many more great choices.

Our special First-Year Seminars carry one hour of course credit toward graduation and may be used in almost any major. Each seminar is on a different, interesting topic. You may take one that relates to your major, or take one on an interesting topic outside your major that you might otherwise never get to explore. Research shows that students who connect to the University in this way are more likely to enjoy and succeed at college.

Register for these seminars the same way you register for your other courses. The one restriction is: Only entering freshmen and transfer students may enroll in these seminars, and no one may take more than one. Choose the one that will be great for you.


Sporting Dogs: The Role of Canines in the Pursuit of Wild Game

Course Number: WFA 1001, Sec. F01

Monday
9:00-9:50 am

Instructor: James A. Martin and Mark McConnell

Game hunters have used dogs for centuries to assist in finding and retrieving food for survival. However, the philosophy of our use of canines is rarely explored. This course will discuss the philosophy and history of domestication of canines for use by hunters. We will explore the evolution of multiple dog breeds and dog training for the pursuit of various species of wild game. The objective of this course is to equip those who use dogs for hunting and those who do not with a basic understanding of why, how, and when to use dogs for wild game hunting.


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Real World Conservation

Course Number: WFA 1001, Sec. F02

Wednesday
9:00-9:50 am

Instructor: Leslie Burger

Shows like Hogs Gone Wild, American Loggers, and River Monsters might be good entertainment, but how much of what you see on TV is really what real-world natural science and conservation are all about? This course will help answer that question as we focus on the conservation and management issues of Mississippi. No prior experience in crocodile wrestling or swamp logging is required!


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CSI: MSU - Forensic Science across Campus

 

Course Number: AN 1001

Wednesday
3:00-3:50 pm

Instructor: Sylvia Deskaj

This course will introduce the diverse faculty and staff at MSU who are assisting in criminal investigations in Mississippi, the United States, and across the globe. We examine forensic sciences from multiple perspectives including computer forensics, biochemistry, DNA analysis, forensic psychology, and forensic anthropology. This course will highlight the realities and fallacies between television crime docudramas and laboratory science.


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Football 101

Course Number: FIN 1001

Monday
3:30-4:20 pm

Instructors: Jacqueline Garner

This class helps you learn more about American football. The class covers the basics of the game, including downs and points earned, as well as more detailed aspects of the game. The details include offensive and defensive formations, the role of each player/position, and penalties. The class is a fun, interactive way to learn more about football!


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SEC Football: Beyond the Field

Course Number: SLCE 1001 Sec. F01

Tuesday
12:30-1:20 pm

Instructor: Steve Turner

College football is an integral part of higher education. Now a multi-billion dollar industry followed by millions, football and its importance in higher education cannot be downplayed. This seminar will focus on the issues of college football in today's universities. The dynamics between fielding a winning football team and fulfilling the central mission of academics will provide a framework for discussions around such issues as coaches' pay, the bowl system, and paying of student athletes. The fall 2014 college football season will provide current topics relevant to these issues.


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Psychology of Motorsports

Course Number: PSY 1001

Wednesday
1:00-1:50 pm

Instructor: Teena Garrison

When most people think of motorsports, they think of two things: fast cars and crashes. This seminar goes beyond the activities on the track to the broader implications of motor sports with regard to human performance, safety, and business. Several types of motorsport, such as stock car racing, drag racing, and rallying, will be introduced and discussed based on their general format; competition goals and objectives; and specific challenges faced by competitors, teams, and officials.


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MSU 2 MD: Applying to Medical or Pharmacy School

Course Number: BIO 1011 or CH 1001

Tuesday
2:00-2:50 pm

Instructor: M.C. Reese and Deb Mlsna

This course is designed to help future applicants to medical or pharmacy school. Topics will include study skills and time management, course requirements and recommendations, GPA expectations and extracurricular activities, how to prepare for the standardized tests (MCAT/PCAT), and other topics related to professional school admission. Guest speakers may include local physicians/pharmacists who can discuss career tracks, current medical students (study habits and time management in professional school), and directors/admission personnel at local professional schools (admission requirements and interviews). BIO majors should register for BIO 1011; Chemistry majors should register for CH 1001; all other students may register for this course as either BIO 1011 or CH 1001.


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Veterinary Medicine: Beyond Shots and De-Worming

Course Number: CVM 1001

Tuesday
1:00-1:50 pm

Instructor: Patty Lathan

This seminar will discuss various aspects of and approaches to veterinary medicine. Each class will be delivered by a specialist in a specific discipline (e.g., small animal internal medicine, large animal surgery, reproductive medicine). Seminar topics will be diverse and include discussions about specific diseases, the importance of veterinary medicine in controlling human disease, and diagnostic and therapeutic techniques used in veterinary medicine. As part of the course requirement, students will be assigned to "shadow" a veterinary clinician for at least six hours in MSU's Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.


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Recreational Drum Circles

Course Number: MU 1001

Monday
9:00-9:50 am

Instructor: Robert Damm

Drums and other percussion instruments provide an exhilarating and engaging experience in rhythm, ensemble, and improvisation. Class members will experience the unique enjoyment of in-the-moment music and the many extra-musical outcomes emphasized in recreational drum circles. No prior drumming experience is required!


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The Photogram: Art in the Dark

Course Number: ART 1001 Sec. F02

Friday
10:00-11:50 am

Instructor: Marita Gootee

Students will enter into the uniquely stimulating world of the photographic darkroom as they create artwork with light. Following in the steps of great photographers such as Man Ray and William Henry Fox Talbot, students will learn how to compose with light while learning how to print in the darkroom. Students will explore the history of the process and be exposed to various methods for creating photograms. By the end of the course, students will have created Art in the Dark. Note: Course meets two hours a week and ends at midterm.


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Extreme Medicine: Understanding the Medical Cases on House, M.D.

Course Number: KI 1001

Monday
2:00 - 2:50 pm

Instructor: Adam Knight

House, M.D. is a popular television show in which many strange and bizarre medical cases are presented. Questions often arise about the validity and probability of the illnesses and diseases presented on the show. This class will examine some of the medical cases presented, discuss the probability and validity of each case, and examine how the doctors were able to reach the correct diagnosis. This course is designed primarily for students intending to pursue a career in any health-related field, but all students are welcome.


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People, Parasites, and Pestilence

Course Number: EPP 1001 Section F02

Wednesday
1:00 -1:50 pm

Instructor: Kristine Edwards

The concept of "One Health" will be introduced, and the relationship between animal health, human health, and ecosystem health will be discussed. We will consider ways students may become well informed and roles they may play in the community concerning public health issues and the inter-related roles of veterinarians, physicians, and researchers. We will discuss well known arthropod-borne diseases such as West Nile Virus, malaria, Lyme disease, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever from a global and historical perspective, as well as what individuals and communities may do to prevent outbreaks.


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Can 2 + 2 = 5? The Math of an Accounting Fraud

Course Number: ACC 1001

Monday
2:00 - 3:15 pm Section F01
Wednesday
2:00 - 3:15 pm Section F02

Instructor: Mark Lehman

The accounting frauds of the 21st century, from Enron and WorldCom to Bernard Madoff, have dramatically changed the accounting profession. Fun interactive activities allow students to explore how and why individuals commit fraud and how accountants catch them.


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Visual Arts: Why We Make

Course Number: ART 1001 Sec. F01

Wednesday
1:00-1:50 pm

Instructor: Suzanne Powney

This course introduces various career paths in the visual arts, such as graphic design, sculpture, ceramics, illustration, concept art, studio management, exhibition design, photography, and mixed media. Learn how successful practicing artists have used their degrees in Fine Art and Design. Focus will be on artists of the 21st century and the concepts and techniques employed to construct their work. Lectures will consist of videos, visiting artist speakers, slide presentations, field trips, and in-class participatory activities, all answering the question of "why we make!"


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Take Charge of Your Financial Future While Building Your Financial Intelligence

Course Number: SLCE 1001 Section F02

Wednesday
3:30 - 4:40 pm

Instructor: Paul McKinney

Wise money management while in college increases the likelihood of graduation and financial success early in your career. Learn about budgeting your money, saving and investing, credit cards, credit scores, scholarship application writing, debt management, and other related concepts. Discover how to make great money management decisions while in college that can positively impact the rest of your life. Aim to be a millionaire!


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Neuroscience and Ethics

Course Number: PHI 1001

Tuesday
2:00 - 2:50 pm

Instructor: John Bickle

What is human morality and where does it come from? Why do most humans act morally most of the time, but some fail to? These questions have challenged philosophers for more than 2,500 years, with no clear answer. In her controversial book BrainTrust, neurophilosopher Patricia Churchland presents a wealth of evidence that morality is a part of our (neuro-) biological nature. We will read and discuss this ground-breaking work, aided by guest neuroscientists from the University of Mississippi Medical Center and the MSU School of Veterinary Medicine. Students in life sciences, medicine, psychology, philosophy, law, and all other majors are welcome.


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Step Up to a Brighter Future in Fashion or Anything Else

Course Number: HS 1001

Tuesday
2:00 - 2:50 pm

Instructor: Phyllis Miller

Although most freshmen have a career in mind, they may not know what it really involves, professionally or personally. This course broadens students' knowledge of career options; allows them to assess their personality types, lifestyle preferences, and professional goals; and helps them make more informed career choices. Activities include leadership and assertiveness training, interviews with professionals, and cross-cultural awareness, with special emphasis on fashion-related careers.


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It's All Greek to Me

Course Number: FL 1001

Monday
3:00-3:50 pm

Instructor: Mark Clark

This seminar will comprehensively look at the ancient Greeks and evaluate their contributions to modern America.

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Grow Your Own Salads and Soups: Vegetable Gardening

Course Number: LA 1001

Tuesday
3:00-3:50 pm

Instructor: Elizabeth Payned

Everybody wants to eat healthy, but not everyone knows how to grow his or her own food. Learn the basics for growing a fall/winter garden. Students will plant, tend, and harvest a home vegetable garden. They will eat what they grow! The garden is located behind the landscape architecture building. No prior gardening experience is necessary.


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Food for the World: The Challenge to Getting it Right

Course Number: PSS 1001 Sec. F01

Wednesday
12:00-12:50 pm

Instructor: William Kingery

Got enough to eat? Every academic major has both a stake in and a role to play in this most basic of requirements. J. Russell Smith opens his classic work Tree Crops: A Permanent Agriculture (1950) with a chapter entitled with the question, "How long can we last?" Smith's question emerges from the historical cycle of forest-field-plow-desert. In this seminar, we will be engaged in lively conversations about the various connections associated with where our food comes from and the challenge to meeting humanity's continual need for it. Join us in exploring your place in getting it right.


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Coaching/Sport Expertise: Learning from the Best

Course Number: PE 1191

Wednesday
1:00-1:50 pm

Instructor: Brad Vickers

This course will provide students with an in-depth analysis of the growth and development of coaches (both novices and seasoned professionals). The course will provide valuable information about what it takes to become an expert coach.


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Viva Latino America: An Uncensored Sampling of the World's Most Vibrant Culture

Course Number: FLS 1001

Tuesday
2:00-2:50 pm

Instructor: Rosa Vozzo

Students will embark on a virtual field trip to several regions of Hispano-America. Students will be presented with cultural information, ideas, and events that have influenced the region, specifically those that provide a basis for comparisons of Hispanic and U.S. cultures. Students will be encouraged to explore cross-cultural comparisons, and to identify patterns that could cause cultural misunderstanding.


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"Like" This Course on Facebook

Course Number: CO 1001

Friday
11:00-11:50 am

Instructor: Cheryl Chambers

Social media are everywhere! Sites like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube have drastically altered the way we communicate with the world around us. This course will investigate the use, prevalence, and effects of social media sites on career building, establishing good relationships, learning and spreading news, and enhancing your education. After this course, you will have a better understanding on this emerging technology and have more awareness of how it can affect your life, for better and for worse. We will discuss these concepts in class and through the web. Facebook profile required!


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Nano Exposed!

Course Number:

CHE 1001 (for CHE majors)

ECE 1001 (for ECE majors)

ME 1001 (for ME majors)

CHE 1001 (for all other majors)

Tuesday
2:00-2:50 pm

Instructor: Priscilla Hill

"Size does matter." "Small is the new big." Studying nanotechnology offers an adventure into exploring the smallest of materials (1 billionth of a meter) to improve the largest of structures. Nanomaterials allow chameleons to change color, and nanotechnology allows development of smaller electronic components and more effective sunscreens for personal use. This seminar explores fundamental concepts, various applications, design and fabrication, and ethics in nanoscience. Since nanoscience is interdisciplinary in nature, it will be co-taught by faculty from several departments: Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.


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The Hungry Planet: Plant Disease Stories

Course Number: EPP 1001 Sec. F01

Tuesday
1:00-1:50 pm

Instructor: Shien Lu

This seminar will tell the stories of plan diseases and their impacts on human civilization. Students will be challenged to think beyond the plan disease outbreaks, to consider the impacts these biological events have on our society and personal lives. Classes will introduce ongoing research and service activities related to plant health management and professional development.


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True Maroon

Course Number: SLCE 1001

Monday
12:00-12:50, Section F03

Instructor: Diane Daniels

Tuesday
12:30-1:20, Section F04

Instructor: Hank Flick

Thursday 3:30-4:20, Section F05

Instructor: Michael Seymour

Tuesday
2:00-2:50, Section F06

Instructor: Kim Walters

Wednesday
11:00-11:50, Section F07

Instructor: Karen Coats

Wednesday
1:00-1:50, Section F08

Instructor: Robert Wolverton

Wednesday
2:00-2:50, Section F09

Instructor: strong> Tom Carskadon

Thursday
12:30-1:20, Section F10

Instructor: Linda Morse

Calling all new Bulldogs! Be part of this exciting new course to learn about all things maroon. We will explore MSU's interesting past, including its history and traditions. We will also bring you to an understanding of its exciting present and future. We will talk about the campus and what is here to help you get started in university life. We will look at the best ways to become a successful student as you start down the road to your future. This course is taught exclusively by John Grisham Master Teachers, legendary faculty who have won MSU's highest teaching award. They are the perfect guides to give you a rich and enjoyable introduction to Mississippi State University. Welcome to the Bulldog Nation!


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First-Year Learning Communities

Mississippi State University is proud to present six special First-Year Learning Communities available to entering freshmen. In Learning Communities, small groups of students take courses together that will apply to University Core Curriculum requirements , in other words, regular courses that you would have to take anyway, but with outstanding teachers specially selected for this program, and a small group of fellow students you can quickly become friends with and study together. Connections between the subject areas and different Learning Community courses are made, and the teachers of these courses work together to bring you an especially enjoyable experience as you begin your university career.

Most of the First-Year Learning Communities are open to any interested students. Some are specially designed for students in specific majors, such as Communication and Psychology. All students should check with their academic advisor from their major department at Orientation to be sure that the courses in their desired Learning Community can be used in their major. Usually, this will not be a problem.

Some Learning Communities require that you apply ahead of time and get permission to register. For most Learning Communities, though, you enroll by simply registering for the courses , first come, first served!

Some Learning Communities are residential , in other words, everyone in the Learning Community lives in the same residence hall. Most Learning Communities, however, place no restrictions on where you may live, and students participate throughout campus.

It is possible to participate in both a Learning Community described here and also take one of the First-Year Seminars described earlier in this brochure if you would like to , no problem. In fact, it would be a great idea!

When registering for a Learning Community, it is essential that you register for the exact course sections indicated in the descriptions. If you do not, you will not be in the learning community. Please be very careful about this.


The PSY-CO Psychology-Communication Learning Community #1

Courses and Teachers (must take both):

Course Number: CO 1013 Section 06

Introduction to Communication

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:00-9:50

Instructor: Cheryl Chambers


Course Number: PSY 1013, Section 07

General Psychology

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00-10:50

Instructor: Tom Carskadon


Open to: All freshmen

How to enroll: Register for the courses, first come, first served.

Description: Introduction to Communication is a small, enjoyable course that teaches highly useful skills. Special topics and assignments will link this course to your Psychology course. Contact for questions: Tom Carskadon, tomcarskadon@psychology.msstate.edu, 662-325-7655


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The PSY-CO Psychology-Communication Learning Community for Communication Majors

Courses and Teachers (must take both):

Course Number: CO 1003 Section 03

Fundamentals of Public Speaking

Tuesday, Thursday 9:30-10:45

Instructor: Khristi Edmonds


Course Number: PSY 1013, Section 09

General Psychology

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00-10:50


Open to: Freshman Communication majors

How to enroll: Register for the courses, first come, first served.

Contact for questions: Khristi Edmonds, kedmonds@comm.msstate.edu, 662-325-8956.

Description: Communication majors will get to know each other in their own section of Public Speaking and will be introduced to special resources, issues, and career paths relevant to their major. Links to the Psychology course will also be emphasized.
Contact for questions: Khristi Edmonds, kedmonds@comm.msstate.edu, 662-325-3320


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The PSY-CO Psychology-Communication Learning Community #2

Courses and Teachers (must take both):

Course Number: CO 1013 Section 13

Introduction to Communication

Monday, Wednesday 12:30-1:45

Instructor: Amy Knight


Course Number: PSY 1013, Section 08

General Psychology

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00-10:50

Instructor: Tom Carskadon


Open to: All freshmen

How to enroll: Register for the courses, first come, first served.

Description: Introduction to Communication is a small, enjoyable course that teaches highly useful skills. Special topics and assignments will link this course to your Psychology course.

Contact for questions: Tom Carskadon, tomcarskadon@psychology.msstate.edu, 662-325-7655


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College of Forest Resources Living-Learning Community

Course Number: WFA 1001, Section F02, Real World Conservation, W 9:00-9:50 am

Learning Community Teaching Team: Leslie Burger, Lanna Miller, and Ian Munn


Open to: Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation; Forestry; or Wildlife, Fisheries, and Aquaculture majors.

How to Enroll: When applying for housing at MSU, go to the section "Interested in Living-Learning Communities" and check College of Forest Resources Living-Learning Community.

To learn more: Prospective students not on campus, contact Cory Bailey 662-325-7873 cbailey@cfr.msstate.edu or Allison North 662-325-0855 anorth@cals.msstate.edu. Once arrived on campus, contact Lanna Miller, Office of Student Services, 662-325-9376, or Ian Munn, 662-325-1379.

Description: This living-learning community is for natural resource majors and is housed primarily in Cresswell Hall. Students can attend the same classes, establish study groups, and network and live with like-minded students. The College of Forest Resources is a small college with career paths that provide students continuous interaction with classmates from the first day of college throughout their careers. Students in the Living-Learning Community will find a valuable opportunity to ease the transition to college life and to build relationships within the natural resource field.
Residence: Cresswell Hall strongly recommended, Griffis Hall for Honors students, but others possible.


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The PSYCH-E Learning Community for Psychology Majors

Courses and Teachers (must take both):

Course Number: EN 1103 Section 20

English Composition I

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00-11:50

Instructor: Becky Whitten


Course Number: PSY 1013 Section 10

General Psychology

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:00-10:50

Instructor: Tom Carskadon


Open to: Freshman Psychology majors

How to enroll: Register for the courses, first come, first served.

Description: A group of 24 Psychology majors in Dr. Carskadon's General Psychology class will also take English Composition together with an instructor with interest in the links between English and psychology, a field requiring excellent writing skills.
Contact for questions: Tom Carskadon, tomcarskadon@psychology.msstate.edu; 662-325-7655


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The Griffis Learning Community

Courses (take one or the other):

Course Number: CO 1003 Section H03

(Honors) Fundamentals of Public Speaking

Tuesday, Thursday 11:00-12:15

Instructor: Khristi Edmonds


Course Number: PSY 1013 Section H01

(Honors) General Psychology

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00-11:50

Instructor: Tom Carskadon


Residence: Griffis Hall

Open to: Freshman Honors students who will commit to living in Griffis Hall

How to enroll: Contact Dr. Carskadon very soon because this Learning Community fills very early and space is strictly limited; you must have special permission to enroll.

Availability: Initially ample but filling rapidly; act ASAP.

Description: This is one of the oldest and most popular learning communities. Approximately 20 participants live in Griffis Hall and take Honors General Psychology together on MWF and Honors Public Speaking together on TR, thus interacting with each other on a daily basis. The instructors coordinate assignments in the courses to enhance learning and help introduce students to the diverse resources of the university.

Contact for Availability: Tom Carskadon, tomcarskadon@psychology.msstate.edu; 662-325-7655.

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