Fall 2017 First-Year Experience Courses

CSI: MSU - Forensic Science Across Campus 
W – 4:00-4:50 pm.
Instructor: Jennifer Seltzer
Course Number: AN 1001
Description: Things aren’t always how they appear on TV. Using the experience of a variety of MSU faculty and staff who assist in criminal investigations in Mississippi, the United States and across the globe, this course will highlight the realities and fallacies between television crime docudramas and laboratory science. Students will examine forensic sciences from multiple perspectives, including computer forensics, biochemistry, DNA analysis, forensic psychology and forensic anthropology.


Quidditch for Muggles
W – 9:00-9:50 a.m.
Instructor: Rachel Allison
Course Number:  SO 1001
Description:  This class is perfect for a Harry Potter fan or someone who just wants to learn—and play—an entirely new sport. The actual sport of Quidditch was developed in 2005 and has rapidly grown in popularity. In fact, more than 300 teams are registered with the International Quidditch Association, which hosts a world cup every year. Quidditch offers an alternative to more traditional sports in that it was developed with a gender-integrated structure.

Philosophy and Discipline of Karate and Self-Defense
W - 1:00-1:50 p.m.
Instructor: Timothy Derby
Course Number: PHI 1001
Description: The three-fold objective of this course involves understanding the fundamental philosophies and principles that distinguish traditional karate from other forms of martial arts, developing the intangible mental attributes associated with situational awareness and avoidance, and learning effective physical techniques associated with one’s ability to protect his or herself from a physical attack. Students will also learn various self-defense strategies for dealing with the physiological “fight or flight” instinct associated with fear.

Recreational Drum Circles
M – 9:00-9:50 a.m.
Instructor: Robert Damm
Course Number: MU 1001
Description: Drums and other percussion instruments provide an exhilarating and engaging experience in rhythm, ensemble and improvisation. Class members will experience the unique enjoyment of in-the-moment music and the many extra-musical outcomes emphasized in recreational drum circles. No prior drumming experience is required.

The Science and Art behind Treetop Cat Rescue
T - 3:30-4:20 p.m.
Instructor: Robert Reese
Course Number: ECE 1001
Description: This course covers the science and art behind treetop cat rescue—using modern climbing gear and techniques to rescue cats stuck in trees, while ensuring the safety of both climber and cat. Science topics include physics of climbing, electricity and trees, natural science, and behavioral science. Art, or the knowledge in practice, includes on-ground demonstrations of climbing gear and techniques with student participation. The course instructor has performed more than 35 treetop cat rescues in Mississippi over the last three years.

Extreme Medicine: Understanding the
Medical Cases on “House, M.D.”

M – 2:00-2:50 p.m.
Instructor: Adam Knight
Course Number: KI 100, Sec. F01
Description: With its take on strange and bizarre medical cases, “House, M.D.” earned a spot in the landscape of popular television. It also gave rise to questions about the validity and probability of the illnesses and diseases presented on the show. This class will examine some of the medical cases presented, discuss the probability and validity of each case, and examine how the doctors were able to reach the correct diagnosis. This course is designed primarily for students intending to pursue careers in health-related fields, but all students are welcome.

Veterinary Medicine: Beyond Shots and De-Worming
T - 1:00-1:50 p.m.
Instructor: Patty Lathan
Course Number: CVM 1001
Description: This seminar will cover various aspects of and approaches to veterinary medicine. A specialist in a specific discipline—for example small animal internal medicine, large animal surgery or reproductive medicine—will deliver each class. Seminar topics will be diverse and include discussions about specific diseases, the importance of veterinary medicine in controlling human disease, and diagnostic and therapeutic techniques used in veterinary medicine. As part of the course requirements, students will be assigned to shadow a veterinary clinician for at least six hours at MSU’s Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.

Nano Exposed!
T – 2:00-2:50 p.m.
Instructor: Priscilla Hill
Course Number: CHE 1001
Description: “Size does matter.” ”Small is the new big.” Studying nanotechnology offers an adventure into exploring the smallest of materials—1 billionth of a meter—to improve the largest of structures. Nanomaterials allow chameleons to change color, while nanotechnology allows development of smaller electronic components and more effective, personal-use sunscreens. This seminar explores fundamental concepts, various applications, design and fabrication, and ethics in nanoscience. Since nanoscience is interdisciplinary in nature, the course will be co-taught by faculty from several departments, including Chemical, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, and Geosciences.

The Hungry Planet: Plant Disease Stories
T – 2:00-2:50 p.m.
Instructor: Shien Lu
Course Number: EPP 1001
Description:  This seminar will tell the stories of plant diseases and their impact on human civilization. Students will be challenged to think beyond plant disease outbreaks, to consider the impact these biological events have on society and individuals’ lives. Classes will introduce ongoing research and service activities related to plant health management and professional development.

Insect Pets and Pests: Satisfy Your Curiosities or Conquer Your Fears!
M - 11:00-11:50 a.m.
Instructor: John Guyton
Course Number: EPP 1001, Section F02
Description: Insects can provide an essential service to mankind and sometimes even make good pets. This class will teach students about groups of insects to facilitate correct identification of which ones to worry about and which are safe for play. Insects are the most populous animals on the planet and are the most common wildlife encountered by individuals. This course will serve as an organizational strategy for living in a buggy world.

Meat Chemistry and Cuisine
M - 5:00-5:50 p.m.
Instructor: Derris Devost-Burnett and Thu Dinh
Course Number: ADS 1001
Description: Cooking meat is as much an exercise in chemical reactions as it is in culinary flare. This chemistry and cuisine course will teach the principles of muscle composition and meat chemistry, and demonstrate their impact on the quality of the final product. In each meeting, the class will introduce specific concepts related to meat chemistry, and students will be exposed to a range of culinary methods that manipulate the physiochemical composition of the meat product to yield a final dish. This dynamic and engaging learning environment will increase student understanding of the mechanisms that convert muscle to meat and meat to masterpieces.

Grow Your Own Salads and Soups: Vegetable Gardening
T - 3:00-3:50 p.m.
Instructor: Elizabeth Payne-Tofte
Course Number: LA 1001
Description: Everybody wants to eat healthy, but not everyone knows how to grow their own food. Learn the basics for growing a fall/winter garden. Students will plant, tend and harvest a home vegetable garden—and will eat what they grow. The garden is located behind the landscape architecture building. No prior gardening experience is necessary.

The Photogram: Art in the Dark
F – 10:00-11:50 am
Instructor: Marita Gootee
Course Number: ART 1001, Sec. F02
Description: Following in the steps of great photographers, such as Man Ray and William Henry Fox Talbot, students will learn how to compose with light while learning how to print in the darkroom. Students will explore the history of the process and be exposed to various methods for creating photograms—art in the dark. Note: Course meets two hours a week and ends at midterm.

Visual Arts: Why We Make!
M - 6:00-6:50 p.m.
Instructor: Alex Bostic
Course Number: ART 1001 Sec F01
Description: This course introduces various career paths in the visual arts, such as graphic design, sculpture, ceramics, illustration, concept art, studio management, exhibition design, photography and mixed media. Learn how successful practicing artists have used their degrees in fine art and design. The class will focus on artists of the 21st century and the concepts and techniques employed to construct their work. Lectures will consist of videos, visiting artist speakers, slide presentations, field trips and in-class participatory activities, all answering the question of “why we make”!

Museums and Galleries at MSU
W - 3:00-3:50 p.m.
Instructor: Derek Anderson
Course Number: AN 1001 Sec F02
Description: Did you know that Mississippi State University is home to 18 museums and galleries?  This course will introduce students to the variety of artistic and research collections across campus, with tours, lectures and behind-the-scenes visits led by the faculty and staff who work with these important objects.  Students will also learn about the management of collections, archival research, conservation techniques and how to design a successful exhibit.

Take Charge of Your Financial Future While Building Financial Intelligence
W – 3:30-4:20 p.m.
Instructor: John Daniels
Course Number: FYE 1001 Sec. F02
R – 3:30-4:20
Instructor: Kenneth McKinney
Course Number: FYE 1001 Sec. F27
Description: Wise money management while in college increases the likelihood of graduation and early financial success. Learn about budgeting money, saving and investing, credit cards, credit scores, scholarship application writing, debt management and other related concepts. Discover how making great money-management decisions in college can positively affect the rest of your life.

Viva Latino America: An Uncensored Sampling of the World’s Most Vibrant Culture
T – 2:00-2:50 p.m.
Instructor: Rosa Vozzo
Course Number:  FLS 1001
Description:  Students will embark on a virtual field trip to several regions of Hispano-America. Students will be presented with cultural information, ideas and events that have influenced the region, specifically those that provide a basis for comparisons of Hispanic and U.S. cultures. Students will be encouraged to explore cross-cultural comparisons and identify patterns that could cause cultural misunderstandings. This course will be highly useful for students who will take Spanish as a foreign language and for those who will serve or work with Latino Americans in their intended careers.

It’s All Greek to Me
M - 3:00-3:50 pm
Instructor: Mark Clark
Course Number: FL 1001
Description:  This course explores classical Greek culture, its influence on America and the ways in which antiquity sometimes parallels modern life. Through examples of art and poetry, this course considers the Greek ideas and values that underlay the emergence of democracy and traditional education at Athens. Then, through a reading of Greek medical texts, oratory and comedy, the course traces the development of a scientific and intellectual revolution that attracted the attention of the youth of Athens. These sources provide opportunities to see how the new thinking brought into question traditional values and sometimes created conflict along generational lines.

Flower Power: From Farm to Vase
M 4:00-4:50 pm
Instructor: Lynnett McDougald
Course Number: PSS 1001
Description: Flowers are universal in expressing a wide variety of emotions. Flowers are also universal in their origins, breeding, and growing before they are designed. This “farm to vase” course will take students through the chain of floral life and offer enjoyable design opportunities. Learn all about “flower power” in horticulture, art, design—and, yes, romance!

True Maroon Voices
W 3:00-3:50 pm
Instructor: Qianna Cutts
Course Number: EDF 1001
Description: Calling all poets, debaters, and spoken word artists! This seminar is an opportunity to use your critical thinking, research, wordsmith and performance skills to explore issues related to diversity and inclusion, social justice and equity, culture, and your general transition to higher education. Readings focus on the history of spoken word and slam poetry. Activities include writing and performing spoken word pieces and developing a writing portfolio. The final project for the seminar will be a performance open to parents and MSU faculty, staff, and students. Come use your True Maroon Voice!

Cowbell Yell: Exploring MSU History and Traditions Through MSU Libraries/ Historical Archives
M 10:00-10:50 am
Instructors: Denisse Wetzel and Justin Kani
Course Number: FYE 1001, Sec. F01
Description: Cowbells, Bully, and Revelry! Oh, My! Learn about the traditions, myths, and history of Mississippi State University. Explore the changes in students/ fashions from 1880 to 2017. Where did the cowbell come from? Why is Bully our mascot? Enhance your sense of community, curiosity, and whimsy through an introduction to research skills and hands-on experience with MSU Libraries/ vast collection of treasures and artifacts. What a great and enjoyable way to learn how to use the MSU Libraries, by learning all about our beloved University!

For the Love of Animals: Zoo, Aquarium, And Wildlife
T 11:00-11:50 am
Instructors: Carrie Vance and Andy Kouba
Course Number: BCH 1011
Description: So you love animals! Learn about the many science-based career options in the Zoo, Aquarium, and Wildlife communities and the educational background needed to pursue careers in these exciting fields. These cutting-edge organizations are transforming themselves into conservation science centers and cooperative research units for public outreach and education. This seminar is open to all students who love animals and love learning about them, no matter what your major or career plans may be.

Champion Athletes: What Makes them Biologically Special?
R 11:00-11:50 am
Instructor: JonEric Smith
Course Number: KI 1001, Sec. F02
Description: What do champions like Steve Prefontaine and Frank shorter (distance runners), Lance Armstrong (cyclist), Michael Phelps (swimmer), Simone Biles (gymnast), Ben Pakulski (body builder), Usain Bolt (world’s fastest man), Brian Shaw (world’s strongest man), scuba divers, free divers, high altitude mountain climbers, and even Secretariat (elite racehorse) have in common? The answer lies in anatomy and physiology. Based on rapidly advancing science, in this course you will learn how small changes in anatomy and physiological function can lead to championship athletic performance.

Let Me Speak: Introduction to Competitive Speech and Debate
M 12:00-12:50
Instructor: Cheryl Chambers
Course Number: CO1001
Description: Hone your public speaking skills early, and dive into the world of competitive speech and debate. Topics will include an introduction to forensics; public address; informative, persuasive, and interpretive speeches; impromptu speaking; and formal debate. Great preparation for future lawyers, teachers, business people, politicians, and presenters in any field. This is a friendly class designed to develop skills no matter what your starting point—no previous public speaking or debate experience is required!

People, Places, and Things
M 4:00-4:50 pm
Instructor: Anna Osterholtz
Course Number: AN 1001, Sec. F03
Description: Anthropology is more than just Indiana Jones and Bones. We focus on social change and human experience. This course will show how we interpret the past and how we talk about lived experience around the world. Students will gain an understanding of how we use material culture (stone tools, ceramics, architecture, and so on) to interpret lived experience in the past, understand cross-cultural experiences, and identify human remains.

 

TRUE MAROON
Description: Be part of an exciting new course about all things Maroon. This class will explore MSU’s interesting past, including its heritage and traditions. By the end of this course, students will know more about Mississippi State than most of its graduates and will have a much fuller understanding of the university’s exciting present and future. Learn about Mississippi State’s beloved campus and its many available resources to help students start their university life. This class will ensure students know the best ways to be successful. In fact, last year’s course had a dramatic impact on the success of True Maroon students. The faculty for this course includes winners of MSU’s highest teaching awards who will be the perfect guides to a rich and enjoyable introduction to Mississippi State University. Welcome to the Bulldog Nation!

Important note on True Maroon sections: All first-year students may take the exciting True Maroon course, but some sections are only for students with undeclared majors. Other sections are open to students in any major, and a couple of sections are part of learning communities described on page 22 of this brochure. For all True Maroon students, it is essential to register for the section that is intended for your major or learning community. The complete list of True Maroon sections appears on the following page.

TRUE MAROON SECTIONS
TRUE MAROON SECTIONS OPEN ONLY TO UNDECLARED MAJORS

FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F05     T – 2:00-2:50         Donna Reese
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F07     R – 3:30-4:20           Michael Seymour & Peter Summerlin
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F11     W – 3:00-3:50      Jim Dunne
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F13     M – 12:00-12:50         Don Shafer
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F15     R – 2:00-2:50        Renee Clary
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F17     W – 12:00-12:50        Rebecca Robichaux-Davis & John Davis
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F21     M – 2:00-2:50       Cory Gallo
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F21     M – 3:00-3:50 Dipangkar Dutta
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F25     W – 12:00-12:50       Robert Moore & Melissa Moore
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F29     W – 2:00-2:50  Anastasia Elder

TRUE MAROON SECTIONS OPEN TO ALL FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS

FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F04     M – 2:00-2:50      Kim Walters
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F06     T – 2:00-2:50         Donna Reese
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F08     R – 3:30-4:20           Michael Seymour & Peter Summerlin
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F10     T – 2:00-2:50           Diane Daniels
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F12     W – 3:00-3:50      Jim Dunne
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F14     M - 12:00-12:50         Don Shafer
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F16     R – 2:00-2:50          Renee Clary
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F18     W – 12:00-12:50         Rebecca Robichaux-Davis & John Davis
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F22     R – 2:00-2:50           Cory Gallo
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F24     M – 3:00-3:50       Dipangkar Dutta
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F26     W – 12:00-12:50       Robert Moore & Melissa Moore
FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F30     W - 2:00-2:50  Anastasia Elder

TRUE MAROON SECTIONS THAT ARE PART OF LEARNING COMMUNITIES

FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F09     T – 2:00-2:50            Diane Daniels
Note: This section is open only to members of the Day One Learning Community.

FYE 1001 True Maroon Section F03     M – 2:00-2:50          Kim Walters
Note: This section is open only to students taking MA 1313-42 with Kim Walters.

 

First - Year Learning Communities

Mississippi State University proudly offers 12 special first-year learning communities for entering freshmen. In most learning communities, small groups of students take courses together that apply to the University’s core curriculum requirements—in other words, regular, required courses with outstanding teachers specially selected for this program incorporating a small group of classmates who quickly become friends and study partners. Connections between the subject areas of the different learning community courses are made, and teachers of these courses work together to bring students an especially enjoyable experience. 

Most first-year learning communities are open to any interested freshman. Some are specially designed for students in majors such as Communication, Psychology and Forest Resources, while others are for students with specific interests in student leadership and community engagement. Please check with the academic adviser from your major at Orientation to be sure that the courses in your desired learning community may be used in your major. Usually, this not a problem.

For most learning communities, students enroll simply by registering for the courses on a first come, first served basis.  Others, however, require applications and permission to register.

It is possible to participate in both a learning community and take one or more of the first-year seminars described in this brochure. In fact, it is encouraged.

Important: When registering for a learning community, it is essential to register for the exact course sections indicated in the descriptions. If not, you will not be in the learning community. Be very careful about this.

 

The PSY-CO Psychology-Communication Learning Community No. 1
Courses and teachers (must take both):
CO 1013 Section 06, Introduction to Communication, T 6:00-8:50 pm, Cheryl Chambers
PSY 1013, Section 07, General Psychology, MWF 10:00-10:50, Tom Carskadon

Open to: All freshmen

How to enroll: Register for the courses – first come, first served.
Description: Introduction to communication is a small, enjoyable course that teaches highly useful skills. Special topics and assignments will link this course to your psychology course.

Contact for questions: Tom Carskadon, tomcarskadon@psychology.msstate.edu, 662-325-7655

 

The PSY-CO Psychology-Communication Learning Community No. 2
Courses and teachers (must take both):
CO 1013 Section 13, Introduction to Communication, MW 12:30-1:45, Amy Knight
PSY 1013, Section 08, General Psychology, MWF 10:00-10:50, Tom Carskadon

Open to: All freshmen

How to enroll: Register for the courses – first come, first served.
Description: Introduction to communication is a small, enjoyable course that teaches highly useful skills. Special topics and assignments will link this course to your psychology course.

Contact for questions: Tom Carskadon, tomcarskadon@psychology.msstate.edu, 662-325-7655

 

The PSY-CO Learning Community for Communication Majors
Courses and teachers (must take both):
CO 1003 Section 03, Fundamentals of Public Speaking, TR 92:00-3:15 pm, Danny Gardner
PSY 1013, Section 09, General Psychology, MWF 10:00-10:50, Tom Carskadon

Open to: Freshman communication majors

How to enroll: Register for the courses – first come, first served.
Description: Communication majors will get to know each other in their own section of public speaking and be introduced to special resources, issues and career paths relevant to their major. Links to the psychology course also will be emphasized.

Contact for questions: Khristi Edmonds, kedmonds@comm.msstate.edu, 662-325-3320

 

College of Forest Resources Living-Learning Community
Course:
FO 1001, Section F01, Real World Conservation, W 9:00-9:50 am; or
FO 1001, Section F02, Real World Conservation, F 9:00-9:50 am

Learning Community Teaching Team:
Andrew Ezell, Lanna Miller, Ian Munn

Open to: Natural resources and environmental conservation, forestry, or wildlife, fisheries and aquaculture majors

How to enroll: When applying for housing at MSU, go to the section “Interested in Living-Learning Communities” and check College of Forest Resources Living-Learning Community.

To learn more: Prospective students not on campus, contact Cory Bailey at 662-325-7873 or c.bailey@msstate.edu, or Allison North at 662-325-0855 or a.north@msstate.edu. Once arrived on campus, contact Lanna Miller in the Office of Student Services at 662-325-9376, or Ian Munn at 662-325-1379.

Description: This living-learning community is for natural resource majors and is housed primarily in Cresswell Hall. Students may attend the same classes, establish study groups, and network and live with like-minded students. The College of Forest Resources is a small college with career paths that provide students continuous interaction with classmates from the first day of college throughout their careers. Students in the living-learning community will find a valuable opportunity to ease the transition to college life and to build relationships within the natural resource field.

Residence: Cresswell Hall is strongly recommended, or Griffis Hall for honors students, but others possible.

 

Bagley College of Engineering Living-Learning Community
Course: Students participating in the Engineering Living-Learning Community will have access to on-site tutoring and academic advising programs, as well as study areas included in the residence halls designed to create a sense of community and provide a social support network for first-year engineering students.

Open to: First-year engineering students

How to enroll: When applying for housing at MSU, go to the section “Interested in Living-Learning Communities” and check College of Engineering Living-Learning Community.

The Engineering Living-Learning Community (ELLC) is for engineering majors and is housed primarily in Critz and Hurst Halls. These residence halls are located adjacent to Griffis and Nunnelee Halls, allowing engineering students in the Shackouls Honors College to easily participate in ELLC activities. The ELLC provides first-year engineering students the opportunity to contribute to a supportive community that encourages academic, professional and personal growth. Students will develop essential skills for a successful career in engineering or computer science industries. 

Residence: Critz and Hurst Halls

To learn more: Contact James Warnock, jwarnock@bagley.msstate.edu


The PSYCH-E Learning Community
Courses and teachers (must take both):
EN 1103 Section 20, English Composition I, MWF 11:00-11:50, Jessica Thompson
PSY 1013 Section 10, General Psychology, MWF 10:00-10:50, Tom Carskadon

Open to: Freshman psychology majors

How to enroll: Register for the courses – first come, first served.

Description: A group of 24 psychology majors in Carkadon’s general psychology class also will take English composition together with an instructor who’s interested in the links between English and psychology, a field requiring excellent writing skills.

Contact for questions: Tom Carskadon, tomcarskadon@psychology.msstate.edu or 662-325-7655

 

The Griffis Learning Community
Courses and Teachers (must take both):
CO 1003 Section H03, (Honors) Fundamentals of Public Speaking, TR 11:00-12:15, Khristi Edmonds
PSY 1013 Section H01, (Honors) General Psychology, MWF 11:00-11:50, Tom Carskadon

Residence: Griffis Hall

Open to: Freshman honors students who will commit to living in Griffis Hall

How to Enroll: Contact Dr. Carskadon very soon because this learning community fills early and space is strictly limited. Students must have special permission to enroll.

Description: This is one of the oldest and most popular learning communities. Approximately 20 participants live in Griffis Hall and take Honors General Psychology MWF and Honors Public Speaking TR, thus interacting with each other on a daily basis. The instructors coordinate assignments in the courses to enhance learning and help introduce students to the diverse resources of the university.

Contact for Availability: Tom Carskadon, tomcarskadon@psychology.msstate.edu or 662-325-7655


The Day One Leadership Community
Course and Teacher: SLCE 1002, Section S01, Day One Leadership Community, Patty Bogue

Open to: All first-year students accepted into the Day One program

How to Enroll: Apply to the Day One program at www.dayone.msstate.edu

Description: At Mississippi State University, leadership begins with Day One. The Day One Leadership Community is a fall semester learning community focused on leadership development, service-learning and student success. Students apply knowledge and skills learned in a two-credit-hour leadership class to improve their community and create value for a designated community partner.  Significant time is spent both in class and in community service. Focusing on character and leadership development, Day One challenges students to go beyond what they think they can do and accomplish what they truly are capable of doing. Important note: Students must apply for admission to the Day One program and be accepted before registering for the Day One course.

Contact for questions: Stephen Williams at dayone@saffairs.msstate.edu or 662-325-0244

 

The DO-PSYCH Learning Community
Courses and teachers (must take both):
SLCE 1002 Section S02, Day One Leadership Community, MWF 8:00-8:50, Patty Bogue
PSY 1013 Section 14, General Psychology, MWF 10:00-10:50, Tom Carskadon

Open to: All first-year students who have been accepted into the Day One program

How to enroll: Apply to the Day One Program at www.dayone.msstate.edu; once accepted, register for the courses—first come, first served.

Description: A small group of students in the Day One Leadership Community will also take General Psychology together. Social psychology has many useful connections to leadership and community service, and your place will be assured in MSU’s most popular freshman course.

Contact for questions: Stephen Williams at dayone@saffairs.msstate.edu or
662-325-0244, or Tom Carskadon at tomcarskadon@psychology.msstate.edu or 662-325-7655

 

The DO-TRUE Learning Community
Courses and teachers (must take both):
SLCE 1002 Section S03, Day One Leadership Community, MWF 8:00-8:50, Patty Bogue
FYE 1001 Section F09, True Maroon, T 2:00-2:50, Diane Daniels

Open to: Students with undeclared majors who have been accepted into the Day One program

How to enroll: Apply to the Day One program at www.dayone.msstate.edu; once accepted, register for the courses—first come, first served.

Description: A small group of students with undeclared majors in the Day One Leadership Community also will take the True Maroon first-year seminar in their own special section. The one-credit-hour True Maroon seminar will round out the two-credit-hour Day One course to give students the equivalent of a three-credit-hour course. True Maroon starts students on the path to success at Mississippi State University while Day One starts the path to lifetime leadership and community service.

Contact for questions: For Day One, Stephen Williams at dayone@saffairs.msstate.edu or 662-325-0244; for undeclared advising, Wesley Ammon at waa2@msstate.edu or 662-325-4052; for True Maroon, Tom Carskadon at tomcarskadon@psychology.msstate.ed or 662-325-7655

 

The Maroon Infusion Learning Community
Courses and teachers (Take either section of the course):
PSY 1013 Section 01, General Psychology, MWF 9:00-9:50 am, Tom Carskadon; or
PSY 1013 Section 02, General Psychology, MWF 10:00-10:50, Tom Carskadon

Open to: All students

How to enroll: Register for the courses—first come, first served.

Description: Take two courses from the author of “The Insider’s Guide to Mississippi State University.” Students in Dr. Carskadon’s section of the True Maroon first-year seminar will also take his general psychology course—a course twice voted “Best Course To Take Freshman Year” by students and included in the Student Association’s list of the Top 50 Things to Do before You Graduate from MSU.  Double the learning and double the fun by enrolling in this learning community.

Contact for questions: Tom Carskadon at tomcarskadon@psychology.msstate.edu or 662-325-7655

 

The TRUE-MATH Learning Community
Courses and teachers (must take both):
MA 1313 Section 42, MWF 9:00-9:50 a.m., Kim Walters
FYE 1001 Section F03, M 2:00-2:50 p.m., Kim Walters
Open to: All students with undeclared majors
How to enroll: Register for the courses—first come, first served
Description: Take your College Algebra class from Grisham Master Teacher
Kim Walters, and also take a much smaller True Maroon class from the same
instructor. Being in a small group together for True Maroon will help you
form study groups and also help the instructor know you individually in the
large College Algebra class. The algebra class will also offer Supplemental
Instruction, in which student leaders provide help and review sessions outside of
class, a proven way to raise your grade. Excel in algebra, and learn all about
Mississippi State University from the same great teacher!
Contact for questions: Kim Walters, kwalters@math.msstate.edu
or 662-325-3414.


The First Class Learning Community
Courses and teachers (Note: Take one class or the other but not both.)
EN 1103 Section 19, English Composition I, MWF 11:00-11:50 a.m., Kayleigh Few
PSY 1013 Section F20, General Psychology, MWF 12:00-12:50 p.m., Tom Carskadon
Open to: All first-year students
How to enroll: Register for one of the courses—first come, first served.
Description: Maybe you are in a major where you have no electives your first
semester, and you don’t even have room for a 1-hour first-year seminar. Or maybe
you would prefer to learn all about MSU while you are taking a core curriculum
course that you would be taking anyway—one course instead of two. In either of
our First Class learning community courses, you will have a top instructor who
will teach you all the regular subject matter of the course, plus take you through
The Insider’s Guide to Mississippi State University, all in one small, fun class. The
First Class section of English Composition I is taught by the Director of the MSU
Writing Center. You will have a small class with a wonderful and passionate
instructor who will get to know you indiviually as you develop top writing skills.
If you choose the First Class section of General Psychology, you will have the
well known “Dr. C.,” a John Grisham Master Teacher and the author of The
Insider’s Guide to Mississippi State University
. Dr. C.’s regular sections of General
Psychology have 330 students each, but in his First Class section, you will be in
a class of just 24, allowing you get to know each other, form study groups, and
have Dr. C. get to know you individually. There will also be an upperclass student
leader whose job it will be to get to know you and give you helpful advice as you
begin your university career.
Contact for questions: For the First Class section of English Composition I,
contact Kayleigh Few, kls465@msstate.edu or 662-325-1045; for the First Class
section of General Psychology, contact Tom Carskadon, tomcarskadon@
psychology.msstate.edu or 662-325-7655.